Browse Source

Updated from development machine

master
Serubin 3 years ago
parent
commit
803f1d80fc
2 changed files with 20 additions and 10 deletions
  1. +17
    -7
      about.html
  2. +3
    -3
      index.html

+ 17
- 7
about.html View File

@ -25,18 +25,28 @@
<h1>About the Jewish Play Project</h1>
<hr>
<h2>About the "Play Industries" We Look At</h2>
<h2>The "Play Industries" We Look At</h2>
<p>In general toys and games, pinball and videogames are primarily thought of separately. Pinball was born to the coin-op and arcade industries, the same market segment that also includes vending machines and jukeboxes. The business models and channels are very different and members of the Toy and Game industries generally don't include them as part of their own industry. Video Games are more of an overlapping channel to toys and games, but are primarily looked at as another world as well. The Strong National Museum of Play, and I as a visiting scholar there, tend to look at them together.</p>
<p>In the toys and game industries are thought of as separate from pinball and/or videogames. There are solid reasons for that. Pinball in emerged from the coin-op and arcade industries, the same industries(s) that also include vending machines and jukeboxes. The business models and distribution channels are very different and many members of the Toy and Game industries generally don't include them as part of their own industry. Video Games, in some ways overlapping both as they have both home and arcade aspects to them. Play scholars, researchers and historians often look at them equally, as does this website.
<h2>A thumbnail history of the Toy and Game Industry</h2>
<p>In the 1800s, Germany led the world in the production of toys, particularly the state of Bavaria and the city of Nuremberg. Already a hub of industry centered around clockmaking, the industrial capacity was there to support a growth in toys. At the time many toys were made of cast-iron or plated tin. While smaller companies were emerging in Europe, the U.S. and Asia, Germany led the way until the early 1900s when the World Wars reduced the ability of German companies to manufacture and also to sell, due to embargoes against their products. So between the wars and after, the industry in other countries began to grow. Post World War II, Japan became a leading manufacturer but toys and games from the U.S. began to capture the imagination and dollars of consumers both in the U.S. and abroad. As a number of the leading toy and game companies were Aryanized during the rise of Germany's National Socialist Party, many Jewish designers, entrepreneurs and inventors left for Europe or the U.S. to start anew.</p>
<p>In the 1800s, Germany led the world in the production of toys, particularly the state of Bavaria and the city of Nuremberg. Bavaria and Nuremberg had evoloved into hubs of manufacturing initially centered around clockmaking. This industrial capacity grew to encompass a wide range of manufacturing including toys and games. At the time many toys were made of cast-iron or plated tin. While smaller toy and game companies were emerging in Europe, the U.S. and Asia, Germany led the way until the early 1900s.</p>
<p>Starting in the Baby Boom years, a combination of factors led to the large U.S. industry. Returning G.I.s with new technical skills, the availability of military surplus tech, the emergence of the third-party toy and game designer and the refinement of plastic to a viable material for toys and games all contributed to the growth. </p>
<p>In the same way that Nuremberg was a center for toy and game companies due to the manufacturing resources of the town, Chicago was the home for many of the largest and most influential pinball companies, an industry born and bred there. The coin operated game as we know it began to surface in 1930 with Gottlieb's Baffle Ball and the Pinball went through ups and down during World War II (due to material and manufacturing shortages) and came roaring back afterwards, only to lose its market in the end to the digital upstarts, the video game cabinets. Today only one major pinball manufacturer, Stern, remains. The game itself has begun to see a rise in interest in the last decade as nostalgia themed parlors, bars and restaurants have begun appearing in cities around the country. </p>
<p>During World War I, factory lines around the world moved to the production of war materiel. The US and other countires embargoed German goods and some of these embargoes extended beyond the war. During the rise of Germany's National Socialist Party, many Jewish designers, entrepreneurs and inventors saw their companies Aryanized and/or fearing for their lives, left for elsewhere in Europe or the U.S. to start anew. Post World War II, Japan became a leading manufacturer and distributor, but toys and games from the U.S. began to capture the imagination and dollars of consumers both in the U.S. and abroad.</p>
<p>The home and portable video game consoles, and most recently, mobile "smart phones" and tablets have all eaten into the markets for toys, dolls and tabletop games; though there's been a significant revival of interest in board games in the past 10-15 years as new styles and types of board game design have emerged from Europe and taken hold by designers, manufacturers and players world-wide. If you are interested in contributing to the Jewish Play Project you can reach us at Jewish + Play + Project (at) magic dot rit dot edu.</p>
<p>Starting in the Baby Boom years, a combination of factors led to the large U.S. industry. Returning G.I.s with new technical skills wanted to bring those skills, and sometimes even newly available military surplus technology to toys and games. The baby boom saw the birth and growth of the third-party toy and game designer. Last, but not least, the refinement of plastic to a viable material for toys and games all contributed to the growth of the industry in the US. </p>
<<h2>Chicago, the Heart of the Pinball Industry</h2>
<p>In the same way that Nuremberg was a center for toy and game companies due to the manufacturing resources of the town, Chicago was the home for many of the largest and most influential pinball companies, an industry born and bred there. The coin operated game as we know it began to surface in 1930 with Gottlieb's Baffle Ball. Pinball went through ups and down during World War II (due to material and manufacturing shortages) and came roaring back afterwards, only to lose its market in the end to the digital upstarts, the video game cabinets. Today only one major pinball manufacturer, Stern, remains. The game itself has begun to see a resurgence in interest in the last decade as nostalgia themed parlors, bars and restaurants have begun appearing in cities around the country. </p>
<h2>Videogames Emerge</h2>
<p>While there were a number or prototypical videogames created in labs on mainframes in the 50's and 60's, the era of the commercial home and arcade videogames began in the early 1970's with Ralph Baer's prototype of what would become the Magnavox Odyssey. Home and portable video game consoles,"smart phones" and tablets have all eaten into the markets for toys, dolls and tabletop games; though there's been a significant revival of interest in board games in the past 10-15 years as new styles and types of board game design have emerged from Europe and taken hold by designers, manufacturers and players world-wide. </p>
<p>If you are interested in contributing to the Jewish Play Project you can reach us at Jewish + Play + Project (at) magic dot rit dot edu.</p>
<hr>
<h2>How The Jewish Play Project Got Started</h2>

+ 3
- 3
index.html View File

@ -29,7 +29,7 @@
In pursuit of this mission we wish to support enquiry into the history of these “players” within the play industries and the larger questions around the role of Jewish culture and/or practice in the lives of those who made that history.</h2>
<div id="featuredEntryContainer">
<div id="featuredEntryTitleBox"><span id="featuredTitle">Featured Entry</span></div>
<div id="featuredEntryTitleBox"><span id="featuredTitle">Pick of the Day</span></div>
<img src="img/cohen.jpg" alt="Featured Entry." />
<h3>Lewis I. Cohen </h3>
<p>Company: <a href="http://jewishplayproject.org/timeline.html#LICohenNewYork">L.I. Cohen, New York</a>
@ -37,14 +37,14 @@
<br> Cohen was born in the US and in 1814 was apprenticed to a half-brother's pencil
business in the UK. Afterwards he returned the US to start his own business as the
country's first lead pencil manufacturer and the first stationer to sell steel pens
instead of quills. He added playing cards to his inventory in 1932. In 1935 he patented
instead of quills. He added playing cards to his inventory in 1832. In 1835 he patented
and used a single pass, four-color press for playing cards. Those cards became his
exclusive line of business and made his company the leading producer of playing cards. </p>
<button id="exploreButton"> <a href="http://jewishplayproject.org/timeline.html">Explore The Timeline &gt;</a></button>
<div style="clear: both;"></div>
</div>
<div id="exemplarCategoryHeader">Featured Categories</div>
<div id="exemplarCategoryHeader">Toy and Game Categories Categories</div>
<div id="exemplarCategoryImages">
<div><img src="img/trollDoll.png" alt="Featured Entry: Troll Doll" /></div>
<div><img src="img/teddyBear.png" alt="Featured Entry: Teddy Bear" /></div>

Loading…
Cancel
Save